Some of what was said Tuesday about the escalating Canada-U.S. lumber dispute

By The Canadian Press
April 25, 2017 - 1:30pm

OTTAWA — Some of what was said Tuesday as the United States imposed countervailing duties of up to 24 per cent on Canadian lumber imports, opening old wounds in what has been a long-standing trade dispute between the two countries:

---

"We are tremendously interconnected in our economy with that of the United States, but it's not just a one-way relationship. There are millions of good U.S. jobs that depend on smooth flow of goods, services and people back and forth across our border." — Prime Minister Justin Trudeau.

---

"There's always going to be political pressures to raise this issue or that issue ... but the core of this relationship is bigger than any two individuals sitting in the top of their respective governments." — Trudeau.

---

"If we look at the history of these trade actions, there inevitably will be job losses and we will focus our efforts on doing whatever we can to ease the impact of those job losses. That is the reality of this countervail and it is going to result in some tough times for some operators across the country, we're aware of that." — Natural Resources Minister Jim Carr.

---

"We are prepared and well positioned to do whatever governments can reasonably do to help the workers, the industries and the community who will be affected." — Carr.

---

"We remain confident that a negotiated settlement is not only possible but in the best interests of both countries." — Carr.

---

"We're very concerned that this government has no plan." — NDP Leader Tom Mulcair.

---

"When you're dealing with a bully, at some point you have to stop backing up." — Mulcair.

---

"We stand firmly with Ontario's forest products workers and I am committed to continuing to fight hard for their interests." — Ontario Premier Kathleen Wynne.

--- 

"Our action plan on softwood starts with fighting the unfounded claims of the U.S. lumber production lobby and the unwarranted and unfair duties placed on Canadian lumber products." — B.C. Premier Christy Clark.

---

"The goal is to find a solution, even if we must pursue it through litigation. I will continue to work with all levels of government to defend and protect the softwood lumber industry in our riding." — Bob Nault, Liberal MP for the northwestern Ontario riding of Kenora.

---

"It's an absolute disaster for Canada." — Jerry Dias, president of Unifor, a union which represents 24,000 forestry workers at 134 companies.

---

"I do hope and expect that the first go-around we can fight it out, but I do suspect that come September if in fact the second duties are in the same range, there will certainly be some dramatic impacts coming in the fall." — Bob Matters, chairman of the United Steelworkers union wood council.

---

"While the import duty of as much as 24 per cent imposed by the U.S. will hit the forestry industry on the chin, the overall impact on Canada's economy is likely to be limited,"  — National Bank senior economist Krishen Rangasamy in a research note.

---

"We will stand up for our industry's workers and impacted mill communities in Canada and call on federal and provincial governments to work with us to ensure they can maintain their livelihoods during this difficult period." — Derek Nighbor, CEO, Forest Products Association of Canada.

---

The Canadian Press

GUID: 
3de2866a-d2df-4cb6-b36e-2ac2883a8468
updated_date: 
Tue, 25 Apr 2017 16:15:34 -0400

P.E.I. says it's No. 1 in Canada when it comes to recycling and composting

Join the Discussion

We are happy to provide a forum for commenting and discussion. Please respect and abide by the house rules: Keep it clean, keep it civil, keep it truthful, stay on topic, be responsible, share your knowledge, and please suggest removal of comments that violate these standards. See full commenting rules.